Tag Archives: Southwestern

On College Education

The modern world has come to see College as a necessary part of  upper class life.  Once a High School education was once deemed appropriate for business and many more jobs; now, due to the level of specialization needed in many fields, a bachelors degree is considered necessary. One professor of mine impressed upon me the difference between a high school and a college education: the teacher. College professors tend to have doctorates in a myriad of subjects and knowledge to back their titles. However, they lack teaching training and will therefore teach in the best fashion they know.

For some, the teaching is excellent. Rather than merely imitating their predecessors (who have imitated their predecessors), they have studied not only their art, but aspects of education. These teachers are what makes college a worthwhile experience, a combination of superior knowledge and a drive to teach well. On the other hand, there are professors that are fill-ins. They will drone monotonously over the material and when asked a question, divert the question to another subject to maintain lesson plan, or simply sit quietly while a student tries to explain. These are classes to avoid, if possible. Any college education requires General Education credits, and unfortunately some of these classes will have teachers like this. I encourage you to avoid them.

Taking a reputably harder class with a good teacher will be far more valuable than taking an “easy class” from a bad one. Therefore, I do not believe the quality of education in college always exceeds that of high school.

Before I came to Southwestern (SWAU, for those that know it as such), I was an academy student who deeply wanted to go into Chemistry. I’d taken my AP Chem class and enjoyed it, but I remembered one high school teacher that made a profound difference in my life, Alex Prouty. Sadly, he is no longer teaching, but English and History became interesting and enjoyable in his classes. Though I’d always been an avid reader, I hadn’t considered my current majors (and probably wouldn’t have chosen them) except for his influence. I suspect we all have a teacher that made a difference in our lives, and I’ll wager that a majority challenged us and we learned more.

A good teacher, whether in college or high school, or elementary for that matter, makes all the difference in education. So for those of you entering College, worried about your choice in life, I encourage you to find teachers that bring your subject from out of the textbook, even if it is more difficult. I personally can recommend a few teachers from both the English and History departments.

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Filed under Education, General

Music Industry To Target College Students and Universities

This post is a response to an article that can be found: HERE

Greetings,

I came across the aforementioned article and wanted to say a few words about the state of things. At Southwestern (Adventist University), the ability to torrent has been disabled on the wireless network for performance reasons; however, over traffic to torrent sites and torrent tools, both legal and illegal, is restricted on all connections. That in itself is an entirely separate matter and at one point I went over that in a previous article on this blog: Piracy and Internet Censorship

The issue I wanted to talk about was the following paragraph:

“In July this year, the US put into effect a new requirement for colleges and universities to stop illicit file-sharing on their networks. This legislation puts defiant schools at risk of losing federal funding if they don’t do enough to stop illicit file-sharers on their campus.”

There are some issues I take with this. Who does it say controls the government if the entertainment industry can control university funding? Who decides whether what a university has done is enough? Why will this help?

1: Those with money control the government. I know we’d, myself included, like to believe that our democracy is a true representation of the will of the people, but let’s be honest. Lobbyists for many industries pay for senators and congressmen that will vote in their favor. Oil, Music, Logging, Automotive, and many others. They’ve recently had to limit the amount of gifts lobbyists can give to politicians yet again. It’s depressing.

2: My guess is that if this legislation doesn’t have the desired results, then the government will start restricting everyone who has not implemented draconian P2P reforms, but in the end that leads to #3.

3: Yes, it probably will stop piracy a bit, but the truth is that it will only momentarily delay the fall of label companies. Artists are getting more money that they ever have (In-depth Research), so there goes the excuse that loss of record sales is causing music artists to suffer. Many universities and colleges will probably implement reforms, but I worry about what precedent this sets.

I will not say piracy is correct, but the methods that are being used to deal with it are more harmful to America than piracy itself. I always worry when I see websites going to China to escape US censorship. Ironic, but sad.

A few thoughts until some other time.

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Filed under Information Freedom